F2_DESKTOP_C1 Type: hb (krtH)
Lazy Loaded: false
Advertisement

Heat stroke, also called sunstroke, is a potentially life-threatening condition caused by your body overheating. It is a serious form of heat injury caused by exposure to excessive heat and sun. This is considered to be a medical emergency, and heat stroke can affect people of any age, but especially athletes and those over the age of 50. Heat stroke happens when your core body temperature exceeds 105 degrees Fahrenheit. When combined with dehydration, another common symptom in extreme heat, heat stroke can cause damage to the brain and internal organs. In some cases, it can even result in death. Symptoms of heat stroke can be similar to those of a heart attack and many other conditions, and you should seek medical attention right away if you think you might be experiencing heat stroke. Here are some of the most common heat stroke symptoms.

F2_DESKTOP_INCONTENT Type: adsense (1292013171)
Adsense Name: FH_DESKTOP_INCONTENT_728x90
Lazy Loaded: false
Advertisement

1. Extremely High Body Temperature

After spending a lot of time in the sun, you may notice that your skin is incredibly hot and red. This is one of the most easily recognizable signs of heat stroke. During heat stroke, your skin becomes hot to the touch, and your body temperature will reach 105 degrees or higher. Such an abnormal increase in body temperature calls for an immediate appointment with your doctor. Though a sunburn can also leave your skin red and hot, heat stroke occurs when your temperature shoots up above 105 degrees.

F2_DESKTOP_C4 Type: adsense (1610262355)
Adsense Name: F2_DESKTOP_LH_BLW_IMAGE1_728x90
Lazy Loaded: false
Advertisement
F2_DESKTOP_REV Type: revcontent (rev1)
Lazy Loaded: false
F2_DESKTOP_ADHESION Type: adhesion (HmCx)
Lazy Loaded: false

More on Facty Health

Disclaimer

This site offers information designed for educational purposes only. You should not rely on any information on this site as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment, or as a substitute for, professional counseling care, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should always consult with a physician or other health-care professional.