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Adhesive capsulitis or frozen shoulder is a condition wherein your shoulder stiffens. This is quite common and it causes reduced mobility of the shoulder. This condition is commonly mistaken for arthritis because they have similar symptoms. However, these two are completely unrelated. Adhesive capsulitis only occurs in the shoulder joint. On the other hand, arthritis happens to all other joints of the body. Frozen shoulder usually happens to people between the ages of 40-60 years old. It's also more common in women than in men. Adhesive capsulitis can affect both shoulders and just one of them. It develops slowly and usually comes with stiffness and pain. With this condition, the capsule in your shoulder thickens and tightens. Then scar tissue bands form as well. Frozen shoulder has four stages. In each stage, you'll experience different symptoms.

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1. Noticeable shoulder pain (pre-freezing stage)

At the very first stage, it's quite difficult to establish that there is a problem. The very first symptom of frozen shoulder is a noticeable shoulder pain. Even with the pain, you'll still be able to function. Although this is a symptom of frozen shoulder, you won't need any treatment for it. What's important though is to observe if the pain goes away after some time. If it doesn't, then the disorder may be progressing.

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This site offers information designed for educational purposes only. You should not rely on any information on this site as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment, or as a substitute for, professional counseling care, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should always consult with a physician or other health-care professional.